Category Archives: Uncategorized

Don’t “Google” It

A fascinating turn of events about name brand verbs.

Linda W. Yezak

© Viperagp | Dreamstime.com - Computer Mouse And Globe Photo © Viperagp | Dreamstime.com – Computer Mouse And Globe Photo

One of the fun things about being an editor–and I am one, in case you’ve forgotten–is trying to keep up with the ever-changing lexicon. Because of television and technology, we have new words thrown at us all the time. (Even though it’s not new, I just recently learned what TARDIS is.)

Editors have to stay on top of things, like when a client is using a trademarked brand name as a verb. Google is the perfect example. Even my 83-year-old mother asks me to “google” things for her. But according to “Google Calls in the Language Police,” the company isn’t too happy about the way their name is becoming a common household word. You can search the Internet using the Google search engine, but you can’t “google” anything.

Personally, I’m not sure I understand that. If someone…

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Self-editing masterclass snapshots: Characters are grief stricken – how do I stop that becoming monotonous?

Roz knows how to Nail Your Novel

Nail Your Novel

guardgrief-stricken characterI’m running a series of the smartest questions from my recent Guardian self-editing masterclass for novelists. Previous posts have discussed how much extra material we might write that never makes the final wordcount, and how to flesh out a draft that’s too short. Today I’m looking at an interesting problem of pacing:

Characters are grief stricken – how do I stop that becoming monotonous?

One student had a story in which the characters are coping with the death of a close family member. How, she said, could she keep the new developments coming, as the grief process would take many months?

We’d been talking about pacing the story, and how it was crucial to be aware of change. Each scene should present the reader with something new, to keep the sense that the narrative is moving on. That change could be big or small – a major twist…

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What Comes After “Book”

From the pen of my friend Linda Yezak.

Linda W. Yezak

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It seems to take an eternity to go from dream to book. I have ideas that float around in my head and never seem to navigate as far as the page, even to sketch the primary components. Others sit in loose outline form in a file on my computer, and still others, few though they are, have made it to Amazon.

For me, the hard part truly begins once the book is out there. You look at this picture, this meme, this almost-accurate graphic, and you see “Book” sitting on an iceberg, and although the reader boat is in the vicinity, it’s heading the wrong way. Smart sailing. No boat wants to collide with an iceberg. Somehow, you have to change the image to that of a welcoming tropical island. After all, islands go just as deep.

Folks who are great at marketing know how to make their books appeal…

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The Missing Piece – What Most Antagonists Are Lacking

Some important thoughts to consider when creating your antagonist,

Story Life

Every reader loves a good villain, and most writers love them too.  If you rack your brain about some of the most memorable characters in books, movies, and on TV, I’d bet more than a few villains pop up.

I personally find antagonists fascinating.  Sometimes I find them even more fascinating than many heroes out there, and it’s difficult for me to take my attention and shift it back where it belongs (and before you say I should make my villain my main character, I’ve already done that a few times.  Great minds think alike!).

What’s interesting, though, is that when creating antagonists, more than a few writers forget the most important part.

A good antagonist isn’t necessarily just a villain at large in your story world – sometimes he or she isn’t even a bad person at all.  The most important thing to remember about your antagonist is that they are…

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Self-Publishing: How to Choose What’s Right, pt. 2

Faith Blum

Sel-Publishing Post 4

Today’s Self-Publishing post is part 2 of 3 in the “How to Choose What’s Right” posts. Today I will concentrate on editing and proofreading, as well as a few marketing tips I have learned. As always, feel free to ask questions and I will do my best to answer them.

Editing and Proofreading-What’s the difference?

When I first got into publishing I thought that editing and proofreading were pretty much the same. Then I heard other terms being bandied about: Line editing, copy editing, content editing, and proofreading. So, what is the difference and why are some more expensive than others?

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Self-Publishing: How to Choose What’s Right, pt. 1

From my friend, Faith Blum.

Faith Blum

Sel-Publishing Post 3Today is the third post in my Self-Publishing blog series. If you missed the first two posts find them here and here. Today’s post is the first part of three discussions on what to pay for and what to do for yourself.

How to Choose What’s Right pt. 1

AKA: What to do for yourself and what to pay for?

ISBN numbers- free or paid? For ebook only people, this is irrelevant since ebooks have ASIN numbers rather than ISBN numbers. However, if you do a hard copy of your book, you will need to have an ISBN number. Createspace (Amazon’s affiliate for self-publishing your hard copies) offers a free Createspace assigned ISBN. This is personally what I have used for each of mine. You can also choose Createspace’s $10 Custom ISBN option which allows you to use your imprint name. If you want to have yourself listed as…

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Self-Publishing: My Journey

Faith Blum

Sel-Publishing Post 1

Today begins a five-week blog series on independent publishing how-tos and tips. Today, I will start with my reasons for choosing the independently publishing route vs. the traditionally publishing route as well as share a little bit of my journey along the way.

Indie vs. Traditional

Duel

The indie publishing and the traditional publishing worlds have both changed a lot even since I first seriously looked into getting published in January 2013. For one thing, indie publishing is much more popular and for another, it isn’t that much different than traditional publishing anymore.

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A Study in Omniscient POV: Part 2

Continuing with Linda Yezak’s A Study in Omniscient POV

Linda W. Yezak

Billy CoffeyWednesday, I introduced the validity of the omniscient point of view as the perspective of choice for authors who are “after the kind of insight that comes from contemplating events rather than participating in them” (Characters, Emotions, & Viewpoint, Nancy Kress, p. 207). Billy Coffey used the POV in his newest release, In the Heart of the Dark Wood, and it took me a bit to get used to it.

Omniscient fell out of favor years ago, particularly in genre fiction. Authors today cater to the readers’ wish to engage in the story from under the character’s skin. But that doesn’t mean omniscient is “wrong” or a “bad choice,” particularly for literary fiction, which Billy’s novel is, and particularly when done well–which is the point of this post. Did Billy do it well?

I can’t find a list of points that make a good omniscient piece, so I’m going…

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What About the Other Guy? by Robin Patchen

Continuing resources for learning how to write in the POV of your choice and doing it well.

Linda W. Yezak

Thoughts and Emotions of the Non-POV Character

When I was a new writer first learning about Point of View, it seemed unconscionable to me that my readers might miss the nuances of what the non-POV character was thinking and feeling in a scene. I thought maybe my book was one of the few that really needed to be written from the omniscient viewpoint. I desperately wanted to embrace head-hopping as a valid literary choice.

Years have gone by, and I’ve seen the error of my ways. As an editor, I hear similar arguments from my clients. Unfortunately, the arguments don’t fly for them, either. It doesn’t matter that your favorite classical writer employed omniscient POV, and nobody will be swayed by the fact that some bestselling author head-hops all the time. When you’re a bestseller, you can break the rules, too. And maybe in a hundred years, your book will…

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