Category Archives: Tools

34 Writing Tips That Will Make You a Better Writer

We all love and can use helpful writing tips. Here are some submitted to Daily Writing Tips by their readers for you to peruse.

A couple of weeks ago we asked our readers to share their writing tips. The response was far beyond the initial expectations, and the quality of the tips

Source: 34 Writing Tips That Will Make You a Better Writer

Haven’t I Learned Enough? – Wordquill

Good writers (and editors) never stop learning. It is a daily, ongoing process.

When I was teen writer, I was on top of things. I had quite strong opinions on what was right, what was wrong, what was accurate, and what was completely laughable. I knew how to write. Then I grew up. One of the most important steps of this “growing up” was realizing that nope, I […]

Source: Haven’t I Learned Enough? – Wordquill

How to Calculate Your Book’s Length Before Writing – Helping Writers Become Authors

Getting all of your structural parts and pieces in the right place in your book can really depend on knowing your book’s length. Here is how to get that right.

 

Use these intuitive methods to calculate your book’s length and plan the perfect timing for all the structural beats within your plot.

Source: How to Calculate Your Book’s Length Before Writing – Helping Writers Become Authors

The Creative Penn Blog: Helping you write, publish and market your book | The Creative Penn

No indie writer can afford missteps when it comes to their marketing. Here are some things to avoid from author and marketing expert Joanna Penn.

Articles, audio, and video to help you write, publish and market your book.

Source: The Creative Penn Blog: Helping you write, publish and market your book | The Creative Penn

Free Scrivener Template: How to Structure Your Story – Helping Writers Become Authors

File this under “Tools you can use!”

Since I now use Scrivener exclusively for my fiction (buh-bye, Word), I wanted to share with you an updated free Scrivener template based on my own process.

Plus a new expert level webinar!

Source: Free Scrivener Template: How to Structure Your Story – Helping Writers Become Authors

4 Reasons You Should Outline Your Settings – Helping Writers Become Authors

Outline my what? Settings? Are you nuts? Okay … that makes some awesome sense now.

Figuring out how to outline your settings will not only help you write better plots, themes, and characters but also to research and draft better as well.

Source: 4 Reasons You Should Outline Your Settings – Helping Writers Become Authors

5 Ways to Use Myers-Briggs for Characters – Helping Writers Become Authors

Understanding personality types can help you design living, breathing, realistic characters that will drive your writing to a much better place.

Here are five ways you can use an understanding of Myers-Briggs for characters that are bigger, better, and more realistic.

Source: 5 Ways to Use Myers-Briggs for Characters – Helping Writers Become Authors

5 Ways to Write a Perfect First Draft (or Nearly) – Helping Writers Become Authors

So, you’ve got your first draft nearly done and it is just the mess it is supposed to be, right?

The first step on the road to a perfect first draft is consciously addressing why so many writers believe this is an impossible idea.

Source: 5 Ways to Write a Perfect First Draft (or Nearly) – Helping Writers Become Authors

Writing A Novel: How Story Structure Creates Foreshadowing | The Creative Penn

Have all the plot twists and surprises that you want in your story, but make sure they conform to your structure and that you have properly foreshadowed them.

 

Creativity flourishes within a structure, and I have personally found that understanding the structure of story is the best way to help you grasp all the aspects of writing a novel. In today’s article, author K.M. Weiland (@KMWeiland) discusses foreshadowing, part of her book, Structuring Your Novel. How do you explain the concept of foreshadowing? So, it’s like this thing that happens before this other thing happens to let readers know that the other thing is going to happen. Tough, isn’t it? But for all that it can be a bit difficult to succinctly explain, foreshadowing is really a simple

Source: Writing A Novel: How Story Structure Creates Foreshadowing | The Creative Penn