Did You Know “Show vs. Tell” Matters in Foreshadowing Too? – Helping Writers Become Authors

From one of my most favorite authors and writers of writing tips, K.M. Weiland, here is some excellent advice on foreshadowing correctly.

Did You Know “Show vs. Tell” Matters in Foreshadowing Too? – Helping Writers Become Authors.

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How to Write Internal Dialogue | Writers In The Storm

Every book I have worked on seems to struggle in one way or another with internal dialogue. Here are some excellent tips on how write it right. My thanks to Marcy Kennedy for writing this helpful post.

How to Write Internal Dialogue | Writers In The Storm.

5 tips for handling amnesia and back story

Backstory is one thing that all writers struggle with. Here is some excellent advice on how to handle it.

Nail Your Novel

amnesiaI haven’t forgotten I’m half-way through the self-editing masterclass snapshots, but I got this fantastic question from a writer who’d read a post of mine about back story.

I’ve begun the same novel a couple times and it relies so heavily on back story that I’ve begun to wonder if I should just write it as a separate novel.

But I want to write a novel about AFTER the hero saves the world – and in doing so has forgotten HOW he did it and WHAT happened, which is a huge plot point. I want to avoid the ‘zero to hero’ shtick that is so overdone – and I want the reveals to be important with emotional impact. I’m not sure it will work. Thoughts?

(Here’s the post that started it, and the question in full. Scroll down and look for Mark.)

I like this concept of exploring…

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Don’t “Google” It

A fascinating turn of events about name brand verbs.

Linda W. Yezak

© Viperagp | Dreamstime.com - Computer Mouse And Globe Photo © Viperagp | Dreamstime.com – Computer Mouse And Globe Photo

One of the fun things about being an editor–and I am one, in case you’ve forgotten–is trying to keep up with the ever-changing lexicon. Because of television and technology, we have new words thrown at us all the time. (Even though it’s not new, I just recently learned what TARDIS is.)

Editors have to stay on top of things, like when a client is using a trademarked brand name as a verb. Google is the perfect example. Even my 83-year-old mother asks me to “google” things for her. But according to “Google Calls in the Language Police,” the company isn’t too happy about the way their name is becoming a common household word. You can search the Internet using the Google search engine, but you can’t “google” anything.

Personally, I’m not sure I understand that. If someone…

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Self-editing masterclass snapshots: Characters are grief stricken – how do I stop that becoming monotonous?

Roz knows how to Nail Your Novel

Nail Your Novel

guardgrief-stricken characterI’m running a series of the smartest questions from my recent Guardian self-editing masterclass for novelists. Previous posts have discussed how much extra material we might write that never makes the final wordcount, and how to flesh out a draft that’s too short. Today I’m looking at an interesting problem of pacing:

Characters are grief stricken – how do I stop that becoming monotonous?

One student had a story in which the characters are coping with the death of a close family member. How, she said, could she keep the new developments coming, as the grief process would take many months?

We’d been talking about pacing the story, and how it was crucial to be aware of change. Each scene should present the reader with something new, to keep the sense that the narrative is moving on. That change could be big or small – a major twist…

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