5 Reasons Internal Dialogue is Essential in Fiction (And How to Use It in Your Story)

Internal dialogue is incredibly important. Doing it right is critical.

Kristen Lamb's Blog

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Today, I have a special treat for you guys. Author, speaker, editor and long-time W.A.N.A. International Instructor Marcy Kennedy is here to talk about internal dialogue—when to use it, why we use it and how not to get all cray-cray with it.

Trust us. As editors, Marcy and I see it all. Often newer writers swing to one extreme or another. Either they stay SO much in a character’s head that we (the reader) are trapped in The Land of Nothing Happening or we’re never given any insight into the character’s inner thought life, leaving said character as interesting as a rice cake.

Like all things in fiction, balance is key. Marcy is here to work her magic and teach y’all how to use internal dialogue for max effect.

Take it away, Marcy!

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Understanding why something is important to our writing lays the foundation for bettering our writing because it…

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Let’s Get Visible!

Interesting discussion about publishing and marketing from Linda Yezak.

Linda W. Yezak

Now that my manuscript for The Final Ride is finished and awaiting my publisher’s approval, I have to turn my attention toward marketing the thing. I don’t know about you, but I feel like I’ve read a gazillion books about marketing and promo, and it seems they all have the same things to say: have a blog (or not); work the social media; have an Amazon page, a Goodreads page,a Facebook author page; develop a tribe; join organizations. Find a niche. Don’t be spammy. Develop relationships.

Absolutely.

All that advice is great for developing your platform, but when it comes to the nuts and bolts of marketing, these books seemed to fall short. There are helpful blogs out there–like Joanna Penn’s, The Creative Penn–where you can get some great ideas, but I need a strategy.

Let’s Get Visible, by David Gaughran helped me develop one. Gaughran goes into…

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New in Town – Story Structure Analysis

Did you ever wonder about your stories structure? A good way to learn about story structure is to analyze other stories for their structure. The great news is that someone is doing that for you. Her name is K.M. Weiland and she has a whole database of story structure on her website for you to browse through. Here is a link to one.  Once there, you can see all the others. Enjoy!

New in Town – Story Structure Analysis.